construction plans_canstockphoto20773965-2 1030X385

Residential construction starts up 240%, nonresidential up 245%.

Ven-American Real Estate is exclusively representing an entire 32,000-square-foot industrial building for sale within a 3-building, Class A industrial park located at 2401 SW 145 Avenue in Miramar, Florida.

|

 

The building, one of 3 buildings within Monarch Commerce Center, features a ±6,000-square-foot premium office space including conference rooms and a lounge; an additional  ±6,000-square-foot mezzanine; 24’ clear height, racked warehouse space; a rear-loaded dock high and 7 loading doors; heavy 3-phase power; fire sprinklers and impact windows.

Andrew Kruss, Director of Commercial Services for Ven-American Real Estate, will lead leasing efforts.

Ideally positioned just North of Miramar Parkway and just East of I-75, Monarch Commerce Center is located within 30 minutes of Miami International Airport, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Int’l Airport and Port Everglades.

Monarch Commerce Center 1

Monarch Commerce Center 2

Monarch Commerce Center 3

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FLYER

 

Contact Andrew Kruss, Owner/Agent
Ven-American Real Estate, Inc.
305.496.2950

 

Whereas some scientific fashions predict sufficient polar ice soften to convey no less than 10 ft of sea stage rise to South Florida by 2100, only a modest 12 inches would make 15% of Miami uninhabitable, and far of that beachside property is amongst America’s most beneficial.

Even now, as extra frequent “king tides” bubble up via Florida’s porous limestone, pushing fish via sewers and onto streets, residents are changing into extra conscious that their metropolis is constructed on the rippling cabinets, ridges and canyons of a fossil seabed.

“Water is just going again to the identical locations it flowed ages in the past,” says Sam Purkis, Chair of the College of Miami’s Geosciences Division. “The irony is what occurred 125,000 years in the past goes to dictate what occurs to your own home now.”

The fickle undulations between metropolis blocks might imply the distinction between survival and retreat, and the rising price of altitude is sparking a noticeable shift in neighborhood activism and municipal budgets.

Miami Seaside is spending hundreds of thousands elevating roads, upgrading pumps and altering constructing codes to permit residents to lift their mansions by 5 ft. However in working-class, immigrant neighborhoods like Little Haiti, year-to-year sea stage rise will get misplaced within the day-to-day wrestle, and most had no concept that they dwell a lofty three ft increased than the rich of us on Miami Seaside.

They came upon when builders began calling, from all over the place.

“They have been calling from China, from Venezuela. Coming right here with circumstances of cash!” says Marleine Bastien, a neighborhood organizer and longtime resident. “We used to assume that the attract of Little Haiti was the truth that it is near downtown, near each airports and near the seashore. Unbeknownst to us, it is as a result of we are positioned at the next altitude.”

Mentioning a row of vacant outlets, she ticks off the names of a dozen small enterprise homeowners she says have been compelled out by rising rents, and lists others who she says unwittingly took lowball presents with no understanding of Miami’s housing disaster.

“In case you promote your private home in Little Haiti, you assume that you simply’re making a giant deal, and it is solely after you promote, and then you definately understand, ‘Oh, I can’t purchase anyplace else.’”

After her neighborhood middle and day faculty have been priced out of three totally different buildings, she caught wind of plans to construct the sprawling $1 billion Magic Metropolis growth on the sting of Little Haiti, that includes a promenade, high-end retail shops, high rise residences and imagined by a consortium of native buyers, together with the founding father of Cirque du Soleil.

Magic Metropolis builders insist that they picked the location based mostly on location, not elevation. They promised to protect the soul of Little Haiti and provides $31 million to the neighborhood for inexpensive housing and different applications, but it surely wasn’t sufficient for Bastien.

“This can be a plan to really erase Little Haiti,” Bastien says. “As a result of that is the one place the place immigration and local weather gentrification collide.”

She fought the event with all of the protesters and hand-lettered indicators she might muster, however after a debate that went till 1 a.m., commissioners authorised the allow with a Three-Zero vote on the finish of June.

“The world we took was all industrial,” says Max Sklar, VP with Plaza Fairness Companions and a member of the event staff. “There was no actual thriving financial system round these warehouses or vacant land. And so our objective is to create that financial system. Can we appease all people? Not 100%, that is not possible. It is not sensible. However we have listened to them.”

He repeats a promise to ship $6 million to a Little Haiti neighborhood belief earlier than ground is even damaged and, as an indication that he listened to no less than one demand, acknowledges that the advanced will now be known as Magic Metropolis Little Haiti.

However whereas Bastien mourns the defeat, her neighbor and fellow organizer Leonie Hermantin welcomes the funding and hopes for the perfect.

“Even when Magic Metropolis didn’t come immediately, the tempo of gentrification is so speedy that our folks won’t be able to afford houses right here anyhow,” Bastien says with a resigned head shake. “Magic Metropolis is just not the federal government. Reasonably priced housing insurance policies have to return from the federal government.”

“Local weather gentrification is one thing that we are very intently monitoring,” Miami Mayor Francis Suarez tells me. “However we have not seen any direct proof of it but.”

Suarez is the uncommon Republican who passionately argues for local weather mitigation plans and helped champion the $400 million Miami Perpetually bond, authorised by voters to fund motion to guard the town from the ravages of upper seas and stronger storms.

“We really created in our first tranche of Miami Perpetually, a sustainability fund for folks to renovate their houses in order that they’ll keep of their properties somewhat than having to promote their properties,” Suarez says.

However that fund is a comparatively small $15 million, not sufficient to dent a housing disaster that grows with every warmth wave and hurricane, in a metropolis the place over 1 / 4 of residents dwell under the poverty stage.

What’s taking place in Little Haiti might be only one instance of a “local weather apartheid” that the United Nations warns is forward, the place there can be a gulf between the wealthy who can shield themselves from the influence of local weather change and the poor who are left behind.

Philip Alston, the UN Particular Rapporteur on excessive poverty and human rights, mentioned there was already proof of how the local weather disaster impacts the wealthy and poor in a different way. And he identified that these harm most have been seemingly these least accountable.

“Perversely, whereas folks in poverty are accountable for only a fraction of world emissions, they’ll bear the brunt of local weather change, and have the least capability to guard themselves,” Alston wrote final month.

 

Source: Nosy Media

Frank Cestero is in a sweet spot. The Puerto Rican gets to enjoy the warm, tropical weather of Palm Beach County in the US state of Florida, while the small company he works for is booming thanks to robust growth in the global renewable energy sector.

Cestero is the chief financial officer (CFO) of SolarTech Universal, headquartered in the coastal city of Riviera Beach. Founded in 2012, SolarTech‘s panels are made using advanced robotics and solar cell technology designed by the company’s European partner, Meyer Burger, a Swiss firm operating in Germany and Singapore.

Its cutting-edge equipment allows the green energy company to focus on the premium end of the market. That seems to be working out. SolarTech will be adding a second production line by the end of the year, creating an expected 70 new jobs in the process.

“Demand is robust,” said Cestero. “We’re very bullish over the next 24 months.”

Favorable Business Climate

Governments and businesses have increasingly set their sights on harnessing the power of the sun to meet their energy needs. Furthermore, government policy changes in response to climate change have created incentives and mandates at the local, state and national levels.

Technological improvements, meanwhile, have slashed solar power production costs, making it more accessible to commercial and residential customers. Demand for clean power has also been on the rise over the past several years, with consumers seeing the benefits of shifting to clean sources of energy and decentralized power distribution.

Against this backdrop, companies big and small are optimistic about the future. Market players like CED Greentech, a large US solar panel distributor and SolarTech customer, have increased their investments over the past couple of months.

“The market is pretty dynamic,” said Tristan Tedford, a CED Greentech account manager setting up shop in Pompano Beach, a city just north of Fort Lauderdale. “Module prices have dropped and you have an emerging electric vehicle market coming.”

The Trump Tariffs

The industry’s growth and increasing strategic significance, coupled with complaints from American solar manufacturers about unfair trade competition, were all a part of the reason why US President Donald Trump zeroed in on solar panels, among other products, for tariffs in early 2018.

“The tariff narrowed the price gap between the Chinese product and US product and by highlighting the US product, it has increased awareness of US-made products among end-users and middle-market buyers,” Cestero said.

He claims that by the end of this year SolarTech will be the only domestic manufacturer of exclusively US-made panels, with over 70 percent of its inputs sourced domestically. This is significant because it gives a niche player like SolarTech access to the lucrative public sector, as state and local governments strive to meet CO2-reduction targets by increasing public investment in green energy.

Industry Backlash

But some in the US solar industry have aggressively pushed back against Trump‘s tariffs. One example is SunPower, which is majority-owned by French oil giant Total. The San Jose-based company threatened to curtail its new capital investments and slash jobs if it didn’t receive an exemption from Trump‘s tariffs.

The company builds most of its solar products in Mexico and the Philippines and has argued that the millions of dollars it would pay in import duties threatened its growth plans. After months of lobbying the Trump administration, SunPower received an exemption from the tariffs, boosting the firm’s stock price.

A Solar Slowdown?

The latest industry figures value the US solar sector at $28 billion (€24.13 billion). The industry employs more than 250,000 Americans, with about 40 percent of those working in installation and 20 percent in manufacturing. Five years ago, the sector was installing 3,000 megawatts of solar capacity annually. In 2017, the market grew by as much as 10,000 megawatts.

But experts fear this kind of growth will soon be a thing of the past. Dan Whitten, a spokesman for the US Solar Energy Industries Association, said that since January, more than $2.5 billion in solar projects have been canceled and roughly 9,000 American jobs have either been lost or have not been created as a result of the tariffs.

“If demand drops because products are artificially made too expensive for consumers, nobody wins. It’s unlikely that US manufacturing will expand enough to satisfy burgeoning demand,” Whitten told DW. “While we support new US manufacturing, companies are still going to have a hard time competing with products from overseas in the years ahead.”

Made In Jacksonville

China‘s decision to cut back installed solar capacity this year by reducing subsidies has severely affected the global market for solar panels. While surging capacity had left the country struggling to build sufficient national electrical infrastructure, cuts have forced Chinese panel makers to find new buyers overseas.

In March, Florida‘s largest utility NextEra Energy agreed to buy 7 million solar panels from China‘s leading solar maker JinkoSolar Holding. Alongside that agreement, JinkoSolar is building its first US solar panel factory in Jacksonville Florida‘s most populous city.

Once the factory reaches full production after November, JinkoSolar expects it to churn out more than 1 million panels a year for the US market.

While JinkoSolar‘s new plant will boost overall US production, modern solar panel factories are increasingly automated, and profits will likely flow offshore.

Still, city officials in Jacksonville see the new Chinese investment as a major win for local businesses, particularly in services and logistics. The adjacent port expects to handle cargo shipments of raw materials and solar panel components needed for the new plant’s operations.

“In addition to creating 250 new jobs, we expect that JinkoSolar will expand its economic impact in the Jacksonville area as the demand for solar panels in the US grows,” said Tia Ford, a city spokeswoman.

 

Source: DW

The CEO of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce has a worry that many civic leaders in smaller and less prosperous areas would like to share: development is plunging ahead at breakneck speeds.

“There’s been so much commercial development in Miami and Dade County, that’s one reason why we made the top 20 list for Amazon,” Alfred Sanchez tells Globe.St. com.

He was referring to Miami earlier this year being named in the final 20 cities for Amazon’s new second headquarters in North America, what they’ve dubbed HQ2. The online giant started out with more than 320 locations and whittled it down dramatically.

“What I really worry about is that development is happening so quickly with such a large volume of stuff that’s going to happen that we get ahead of planned development,” Sanchez says.

Traffic is Growing Issue

One particular concern: congested traffic.

“That’s our number one issue, so that when you live here, you’re not stuck in traffic all day long in the downtown area,” Sanchez says.

He cites promising new commercial developments moving the area forward such as the Chinatown project in North Miami. It was recently in the news as requests were made for proposals from architectural firms.

The Chinatown Cultural Arts & Innovation District is to be comprised of 16 blocks of commercially zoned land along Northwest Seventh Avenue between 119th and 135th streets. The area is to be complete with parks, green space, bike lanes and rooftop gardens, along with pagodas, canals and an entrance inspired by the Ming Dynasty.

Many Major Projects Planned

Another promising project he mentioned: Developer Moishe Mana recently secured a $20.13 million construction loan to build Mana Wynwood Americas-Asia Trade Center & International Financial Center. Mana plans to build a center which will feature 10 million SF of commercial space as a trade hub to encourage and facilitate trade between China, Asia, Latin America, North America and the Caribbean. The project will be built in multiple phases with phase 1 including the development of 8.5 acres of Wynwood with 4.68 million SF of Class A office space, showrooms, retail, hotels and other development.

As for infrastructure keeping up with development, Sanchez cites work by the New World Center committee originally formed by the chamber in 1976. Their goal is to “have a catalytic influence on downtown projects in respect of the public and private sectors.”

An area the chamber is looking at as a priority is traffic.

“You need a master plan and the chamber plays a big part in it. We’re trying to develop transit solutions,” Sanchez says.

 

Source: GlobeSt.

Bjarke Ingels Group has unveiled designs for a massive mixed-use development that is elevated into the air on thin stilts.

Located in the central Miami neighborhood of Allapattah, an industrial, working-class district mainly comprised of produce suppliers, the major complex will serve as a new landmark destination in the city.

Dubbed Miami Produce, the project will activate the site with urban farming, restaurants, storefronts, co-working offices, co-living apartments and educational programming.

Click here to view inhabitat‘s rendering slideshow of BIG’s Miami Produce project

 

Source: inhabitat

It’s time America steps up its sustainability measures around the country, and a new report shows which cities are leading the way.

The Sustainable Development Solutions Network released its second annual report on U.S. city sustainability, which looked at 100 of the most populated metro areas and cities around the nation to record how each city meets the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

According to Fast Company, Senior Adviser for Sustainable Development Solutions Jessica Espey noted that the data from this year’s report cannot be directly compared to last year’s. Instead, she said, this year’s data should be seen as evolving data.

“We did change quite a few indicators either due to data quality concerns, or because we found better data. To the extent that we can, we will use replicable data every year so that we can look at comparisons over time,” said Espey to Fast Company.

The report found that 62 cities are less than 50 percent of the way toward making good on 15 of the 17 SDGs that are applicable to urban areas. The No. 1 metro area, San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, was only 68 percent of the way toward meeting those SDGs.

While each city varied on good and bad performances for certain indicators, there were common SDG barriers throughout the nation: poverty, racial inequality, climate interaction and failure to provide residents with healthy food.

The Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metropolitan area ranked 58 with an index score of 46.44. The only indicator where Miami metro area had a good performance was responsible consumption and production.

The Miami metro area category did see moderate performance indicators on hunger, life on land and sustainability. The area also saw a moderate performance in gender equality, which they ranked No. 2 in overall.

However, similar to every other city on the list, the Miami metro area had poor performance on climate action. The area also needs improvement on affordable and clean energy and clean water and sanitation. By highlighting a common problem across the country, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network hopes that officials will begin to make changes to improve.

“It is hoped that the report will also enable cities to identify peers struggling with similar challenges, and help facilitate a national dialogue on how to accelerate progress,” the report states. “It also offers hope by highlighting cities that are tackling these challenges and can offer inspiration to others across the country.”

 

Source: Miami Agent Magazine

Miami has long been marked as the Gateway to Latin America. But with a revitalized urban core and a hot retail market, Miami is increasingly being seen worldwide as a global city.

Miami hit a tipping point, per se, a couple of years ago and the growth has yet to slow. With nearly 6 million residents and an economic output of more than $300 billion, Greater Miami is one of the largest economic regions in the US and the world. In fact, Miami is comparable to Singapore and Hong Kong, according to a study from the FIU-Miami Creative City Initiative.

“We already look at Miami as a major global gateway city,” Peter Muoio, chief economist at Ten-X, tells Globest.com. “It is a nexus for tourism and investment for Latin America owing to its large Hispanic population with cultural and language ties to the region. It also has major attachments to Europe, assisted by its attractive climate and beaches.”

As the study points out, Miami is the hub of the Southern Florida or So-Flo mega-region, extending to Tampa and Orlando, which houses 15 million people and produces more than $750 billion in economic output. That’s roughly the same as the Netherlands, making it one of the 20 largest national economies in the world.

With a coastal location at the southern tip of the eastern seaboard oriented toward Latin America and the Caribbean, Miami is now one of the 25 most important global cities, the report concludes. With its international airport and port, report authors say Miami is the economic and financial hub of Latin America and increasingly a gateway to Europe and the world.

“Southeast Florida’s three major airports have global connectivity, assisting in its gateway status,” Muoio says. “Interestingly, Miami can benefit from economic success in Latin America as wealth creation increases tourism and investment flows, as well as from turmoil in the region, as it offers a safe harbor.”

 

Source: GlobeSt.

On an ordinary day, George Dotzler may deal with wind speeds equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane, torrential rains akin to a monsoon and seismic shifts that feel like an earthquake. Rounding out the day could involve a heat wave and an arctic blast.

Mr. Dotzler, 58, is the director of operations for the Construction Research Laboratory, where builders, developers and architects go to test the durability and stability of glass building facades, called curtain walls. Located at what looks like an abandoned airfield in Miami, the lab has 38 sealed test chambers and all the equipment to replicate the forces of nature.

“It’s like ‘Mad Max’ here,” Dotzler said, referencing the 1979 movie’s dystopian landscape.

A mock-up of a facade at the testing lab.(Photo Credit: Scott McIntyre for The Wall Street Journal)

With skyscrapers sprouting up around the world, demand for structural testing is strong. Big-name architects are increasingly designing towers with quirky shapes, and developers must go to greater lengths to ensure that the unusual curves and crannies can withstand even the harshest conditions. While some testing is required by municipal law, most developers are going the extra mile, since they can’t afford to start mending ruptures and leaks once their buildings are up. Only three or four facilities in the U.S. have experience testing super-tall structures, Mr. Dotzler estimated.

In recent years, the company has been testing 53W53, a 1,050-foot-tall tower designed by architect Jean Nouvel that is under construction adjacent to the Museum of Modern Art in midtown Manhattan. Scheduled for completion in 2019, the 82-story building will have 145 luxury condominiums. The developers—a partnership between Houston-based Hines, Singapore-based Pontiac Land Group and Goldman Sachs —decided on a tapered structure with criss-cross structural framing on the exterior.

“Everything in this curtain wall is bespoke, custom-made for this building,” said David Penick, managing director at Hines. “Every piece of aluminum. Nothing is off the shelf.”

The developers had 6,000 panels of triple-paned glass custom-made by German manufacturer Interpane. Some were incorporated into two mock-ups, which typically include the trickiest, most vulnerable elements of the building, such as the corners, joints and vents, what Mr. Dotzler calls a “Frankenstein arrangement.”

“It’s like a doctor wanting to test a human being by putting together a mock-up with one ear, one nose and one elbow,” Dotzler said.

The mock-up went through a litany of tests. In one of the chambers, both inward and outward pressure was exerted on the glass as part of a water-infiltration test to see how much the design could sustain without cracking or leaking. The pressure was equivalent to about 77.5 mph winds.

Later, a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 aircraft engine with 13-foot propellers was positioned in front of the mock-up. Mr. Dotzler turned on the water spray rack and cranked up the speed of the generator to simulate a dynamic wind load—an effect that’s similar to a hurricane. Researchers then attached a hydraulics system to the structure of the building and shoved segments right and left in an attempt to determine whether they’d be secure in case of an earthquake or wind drift.

“Some of the pressures exerted on these facades far exceed what is likely to occur naturally,” Dotzler said. “If the facade survives these loads, it’s been well-designed and is sufficiently strong. The testing took several weeks and cost about $150,000. No major changes to the facade were made as a result.”

National Certified Testing Laboratories, based in York, Pa., tested a mock-up of an 88-story luxury condo tower scheduled for completion next year in downtown Manhattan. The building, called 125 Greenwich Street, was designed by Rafael Viñoly and features rounded corners.

Steven Della Salla, a managing partner at Bizzi & Partners Development, said his company paid about $210,000 to create the mock-up of 125 Greenwich Street, and another $163,000 for the tests themselves.

Mr. Dotzler said his company also is popular with Hollywood filmmakers, who like to shoot the facility’s post-apocalyptic aesthetic.

“We’ve hosted a couple of episodes of ‘Graceland’ and ‘Burn Notice,’ ” Dotzler said. “But we try to have them only after hours or on weekends.”

 

Source: Wall Street Journal

More than 400 people attended a recent Miami-Dade Beacon Council‘s annual meeting at the InterContinental Miami, where business and civic leaders touted the agency’s recent wins and toasted its new chair.

For the first time, the county’s economic development group combined its annual meeting with its key ceremony, providing insights into the companies it helped expand or move to Miami-Dade.

The Beacon Council reported that 46 companies relocated or expanded in Miami-Dade County in the 2016-2017 fiscal year, bringing in more than 2,100 new jobs to the region and generating $209.7 million in new capital investment.

The event marked the first annual meeting attended by the organization’s new CEO and President Michael Finney, who previously served as the president and CEO of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

“I’ve been impressed with… the warm Miami welcome,” Finney said. “There is really commonality here and a desire to work with one another that’s in full display.”

One of the key accomplishments highlighted at the event was Amazon breaking ground on an 855,000-square-foot fulfillment center in Opa-Locka in June. The project is expected to open by the end of 2018, and Amazon said the warehouse will bring at least 1,000 jobs to the local economy.

While Amazon was not in attendance at the event, other companies present included online boat marketplace Boats Group, which brought in 80 new jobs to the county and a capital commitment of $1.05 million; and Dunham Bush, a Malaysian manufacturer, which added 51 new jobs and $12.5 million in capital.

The economic development agency also touted its new programs and task forces. Specifically, it mentioned its “Connect and Grow” program, which works to connect entrepreneurs and innovators and their new products and technologies to established businesses.

The Beacon Council‘s new Chair Nelson Lazo, CEO of Doctors Hospital, addressed the audience. Lazo takes over for Jaret Davis, co-managing shareholder of Greenberg Traurig’s Miami office, as the agency marks the start of its new fiscal year.

“It is time we told the new story of Miami instead of letting old narratives define who we are to the world,” said Lazo, after thanking Davis for his service.

Davis received video tributes from the economic development group and the University of Miami, which will honor him for contributions to his alma mater on Nov. 4 during its homecoming game at Hard Rock Stadium. Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez was one of many to laud Davis‘ contributions to the county’s economic landscape.

“You’re outstanding and a great treasure…. for everything you have done for this community,” said Gimenez, who then handed Davis a a plaque commemorating Thursday, Oct. 26 as Jaret Davis Day.

Since 1985, the Miami-Dade Beacon Council has assisted more than 1,000 businesses that have created nearly 70,000 direct jobs and generated more than $4.6 billion in capital investments, it said.

 

Source: SFBJ